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The healing power of writing

Monday, March 17, 2014

There are times when nothing but a good book can put life’s vicissitudes into perspective. Whenever I feel down or whenever I feel like some problem is insurmountable, I inevitably turn to a book with the hopes that it will lift my spirits. It always does. 
Sometimes I come across a book that inspires beyond belief. For some time now, I have been saving this review of a book called Wave, an unimaginable story of both loss and survival. 


It is impossible to read Wave without a lump in your throat, a tear in your eye and the feeling that your heart is skipping a beat or two. Wave, by Sonali Deraniyagala, is a moving memoir defined by the tsunami that swallowed her family on December 26, 2004. It is a story of facing loss and finding comfort in memories. On that fateful morning in Sri Lanka, Sonali and her family had been staying in a beach-side hotel when the tsunami hit. 


Her friend first noticed something strange was happening. Sonali whisked her two boys and husband out of the hotel. Her description of the wave that separated them is horrifying, and this is only the beginning of the story. Sonali lost her friend, husband, two sons and her parents who were staying in a room next to them. In a voice trying to inject clarity into utter confusion, Sonali tells her story courageously and honestly.


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