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Apple’s MacOS: Inching toward perfection

Published: 
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
Bit Depth
MacOS X Yosemite is the newest version of Apple’s operating system for it’s computers. Photo courtesy Apple.

Technology keynotes are a special breed of business presentations and keynotes targeting developers are a very special subset of these theatrical sales pitches.

 

On the one hand, presenters are tasked with getting developers excited about things that interest almost nobody, like better access to operating system code and interfaces.

 

On the other, they need to do a rather more colourful show about the amazing things that are coming for the customers who must be wooed to upgrade their hardware, operating systems and their software.

 

During Apple’s developer conference keynote earlier this month (http://ow.ly/xLrET), Craig Federighi made a joke about the decision to name the new MacOS after a famous and picturesque rock formation.

 

Let’s just say that MacOS X Yosemite offers far more productive promise than MacOS X Weed. But the name’s probably also a signal to the Mac faithful that their operating system won’t just be adding features, it’s going to keep running as stolidly as it has in the recent past.

 

Once upon a time—meaning up until around seven years ago—I had a side gig getting Macs back up and running. It wasn’t a money-spinner, but it was exactly the type of thing that fascinates someone curious about the way operating systems worked and the quirks that lurk in the guts of software interactions.

 

My personal Mac mission began way back in the days of Mac OS 6, which couldn’t even install a font easily (Font/DA Mover anyone?). 

 

Almost 95 per cent of the work I did was software-based. Hardware failures happened, but they were a rarity compared to crazy software problems.