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THA picong for Kamla in House

Published: 
Wednesday, January 23, 2013
PNM supporters hold an imitation coffin of TOP leader Ashworth Jack while celebrating their party’s victory in the THA elections on Monday night. PHOTO; MARCUS GONZALES

People’s National Movement (PNM) MP Colm Imbert appeared to make Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar see slightly red yesterday, when he accused her of wearing the PNM’s signature colour while leaving Tobago yesterday. “Totally false!” Persad-Bissessar retorted when Imbert repeated the accusation twice in Parliament yesterday.

 

People’s Partnership MP Roodal Moonilal also said Imbert was incorrect. Speaking during debate on a finance bill, Imbert teased the Government with the PNM’s Tobago House of Assembly victory sweep. He said his “spies” had told him the PM was wearing red when she was leaving the Coco Reef hotel in Tobago yesterday to return to Trinidad.

 

PNM MPs in Parliament were all in some form of celebratory red yesterday. When Persad-Bissessar, dressed in dark green, entered at 2 pm, PNM whip Marlene McDonald gleefully gave her a thumbs-up, signalling pleasure at the PNM’s victory. Imbert, claiming the PM was wearing red earlier, said she had since changed. When Persad-Bissessar loudly corrected him, Imbert retorted, “Yeah, and all you win ten seats too.”

 

Imbert said the Government might have required some form of group therapy after Monday’s defeat, while those on the PNM’s side would have preferred to be elswhere celebrating. He added: “It was wetting after wetting. That was a licking, boy! Some so bazodee with licks, the D’Abadie MP (Anil Roberts) and Pointe-a-Pierre MP are wearing ties that are almost red today.”

 

Imbert said he was in Tobago for the election and had seen a National Security helicopter waiting to ferry people back and forth to campaign meetings. Saying the helicopters were not taxis, Imbert said Tobagonians were against such things and the election was a total rejection of the Government’s economic policies.