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Dookeran: I still have political destiny

Published: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2016
Winston Dookeran

Winston Dookeran, former political leader of the Congress of the People (COP) says although he no longer holds political office, he still has a political destiny.

Addressing the closing ceremony of the Bharatiya Vidya Sansthaan’s (BVS) 45th annual international cultural camp in Aranguez last Thursday night, Dookeran said he was inspired by the work of the BVS and its founder Professor Hari Shankar Adesh, Chancellor of the American University of Hindu Knowledge (AUHK) to find that new political destiny. 

“I have no political office but I still believe I have a political destiny. And maybe this seed you have shown today is now urging me to find that destiny, not in world of secular politics, not even in the world of spiritual development of which I could never qualify but in some other world,” said Dookeran. 

Applauding Adesh’s commitment to serving T&T for five decades and for his work internationally, Dookeran said, “Most people start with good intensions but when they face obstacles they tend to shy away. But you Guruji (Adesh) have stuck to it.” 

Having witnessed some of the musical performances at the ceremony, Dookeran complimented the camp as “a whole science at work” that keeps people together, headed by Adesh “a citizen of the world”. He said although religion and faith were important, “The world moves best when you understand the science which keeps us together.”

Dookeran said by bringing together language, music and drama, the BVS had “the most powerful action that any group can take together.” The campers, he added, have spoken by their ‘deeds, actions, and achievements’

“I have seen the results of the science of the work of the BVS , and I look forward to more, for our citizens here and in the world have become successful people because the foundation they got in this organization allowed them to be protected from all the trials and tribulations of life.”

He said in the early days, “I did not know him (Adesh), but I knew of his popularity. And many sought to claim fame from that popularity. Yet, he never wanted to be in the glare of public adulation. Nor did he want to be in the lights that shine for a few while others were in darkness. He preferred to work in the darkness and get everyone else to light and shine”. 

Dookeran said: “I am happy I have come to the closing session, because I see for myself what you have done and it gives me new inspiration for the work you are doing individually and collectively, not only in Trinidad and Tobago, but internationally as well.” 

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