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My last day in Glasgow dawned damp and iron grey, but my fellow Trading Tales writer Diana McCaulay and I were undaunted by the promise of rain. We set off for the riverside...

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Being healthy right down to the bone

Published: 
Monday, August 22, 2011
Ladies, have you ever felt something ‘in your bones’ and ended up being right about it? Then you know how important your bones are to you, right?

Ladies, have you ever felt something ‘in your bones’ and ended up being right about it? Then you know how important your bones are to you, right? Well, apart from this little intuition function, they are also sort of important to keep you upright, and help you do all those little things like walk well in your high heels, put on your earrings, and jump up and down in your aerobics class. That is if they are healthy and normal! Normal bone is composed of a mixture of calcium and other minerals such as magnesium and phosphate. It also contains collagen, a protein that forms the structural framework of bone.

However, this strong framework can be compromised, causing bones to be weak and unable to support the body’s weight, and functions. One condition causing such limitations is Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a condition that results in loss of bone strength, making bones more fragile and more susceptible to fracture, and occurs when there is a loss of mineral (mainly calcium) content from bone, as well as architectural loss of normal bone structure. Loss of mineral content is referred to as a reduction in bone mineral density, and comes about as a normal part of aging that affects all individuals.

In this instance, women at menopause and post menopause are at an increased risk of osteoporosis. Other risk factors for women include breast cancer, early menopause, and eating disorders. In itself, osteoporosis causes no symptoms. It is only evident when fractures occur due to the weakened bones. Common fractures due to this disease are Vertebral (spinal) fractures, hip fractures, and those fractures cause sneezing, coughing, minor knocks on the limbs, and minor falls.

So, how can Osteoporosis be prevented?
Despite the inevitability of the disease caused by aging or its other catalysts, there are things that can be done to help prevent or at least delay the onset of osteoporosis.